Recipe: Lemon Posset Creme Dessert Pots

This week I have been indulging myself in baking delicious desserts. I’ve gotten a little bored with baking and photographing cakes – too much browns and beiges I wanted to shoot something a little more fun and summery. I was looking back on the blog and came across this old favourite of mine. Well, it’s actually Daddy P’s favourite recipe and it’s been a while since I made it for him. Behold, my deliciously tangy but sweet lemon posset dessert pots!

The lemon posset creme pots tastes like a citrusy creme brûlée and the texture is similar to a rich chocolate pot. It’s velvety smooth and oh so delicious! A word of warning though – this dessert is very sweet so if you are watching the calories or don’t have a sweet tooth, it’s best to avoid this one. Daddy P likes his lemon pots super sweet so I normally use 100g but for the sake of the rest of us, 80g sugar is sweet enough. If you prefer even less sugar, us about 50-60g sugar with the recipe below for a tart lemon taste. That should get you salivating!

Even though this dessert is very sweet, the tangy lemon juice does offset some of that sweetness and creates a refreshing balance. Enjoy it with a black coffee and shortbread (here’s a recipe for both!), or sparkling elderflower and mint for the perfect summer accompaniment.

The Wandering Mother Blog Recipes
Try topping your lemon creme pots with lemon curd for tangy-ness!
The Wandering Mother Blog | Recipes for comfort cooking
A dollop of lemon curd adds an extra tang to the lemon creme!

Lemon Posset Creme Dessert Pots Recipe

This dessert is very quick and easy to make and follows a similar method to making custard. You can also swap the caster sugar for golden caster sugar or light brown sugar. Simply double up the measurements to yield 6 pots.

Time: prep – 5 mins, cooking – 15 mins, chilling – up to 4 hrs
Serving: 3 small dessert pots or ramekins

Ingredients:

  • 300ml double cream
  • 80g caster sugar (use 60g for less sweetness)
  • 1tsp vanilla extract
  • x1 lemon (squeezed)
  • lemon zest (from 1 lemon)
  • optional – toppings for your pots ie. lemon curd, melted white chocolate or shavings, berry compote or crushed ginger biscuits

Method:

  1. Add the double cream, vanilla extract and caster sugar to a saucepan, preferably a heavy-based pan to prevent the cream boiling too fast or burning, and stir continuously on a medium/high heat with a whisk.
  2. When the cream looks starts bubbling from the sides of the pan, take the pan off the heat or reduce to a very low heat.
  3. Whilst stirring, add in the lemon zest and the freshly squeezed lemon juice. You’ll see the cream turning into a thick custard consistency.
  4. Stir briskly a bit more then leave to cool for around 5 mins before pouring or spooning into the tall ramekins or glass pots. If you don’t want to bite into any lemon zest, you could strain the mixture through a sieve as you pour into your pots. This also helps to remove any lumps from your lemon creme.
  5. Place in the fridge to cool for 4 hours (or overnight) then enjoy them alone or accompanied with some shortbread biscuits.
  6. OPTIONAL – you can add toppings to your lemon creme dessert like a dollop of lemon curd or white chocolate, crushed ginger biscuits or even a berry compote for a fruity twist.

If you give this recipe a try, let me know in the comments below. X

This post was first written and published on this blog in May 2015.

Posted by

UK Family Travel & Lifestyle Blogger. Mama of two. Juggling motherhood, work, life and everything else in between. :-)

2 thoughts on “Recipe: Lemon Posset Creme Dessert Pots

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